On a new civilization (from page 189 and pages 195–96):

 

.... Rather than being flattened to an atomist common denominator as now, the other three robust ethoses could interlock in a richer global civilization.  I do not pretend the interlocking itself is a simple task.  It means refining what those three ethoses really demand, deciding what points of contact exist among them, and mapping out the spaces in which each would best flourish.  But having this aim—a coexistence based on interlocking truths, not on relativism and negation—is already better than what ails us.  It is not a new task as such.  The great philosophers and prophets are with us in spirit.  After all, most premodern thought dealt with different types of human nature and layers of truth, and how a civilization could fit them all together....

.... Technology’s easing of contact among regions means civilizations can no longer just practice a salutary neglect of one another, or even a generous curiosity.  A grand story, a grand experiment, must bridge them.  In short, we should aim to merge the remnants of the several defunct civilizations into one living one.  Imagining global integration as the building of a “supercivilization” takes us far afield from the logic of global liberalism.  Where liberals talk of a globe dryly linked by markets and laws and consumerist fads, we must talk of a world as a realm of common meanings....

 

 

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