On corruption (from page 140):

 

.... Both atomists and these critics condemn corruption in China.  Both want officialdom to run smoothly and responsibly.  The nature of what offends them in corruption does differ, however.  For atomists, on the one hand, corruption wreaks havoc on impersonal performance standards and predictable rewards, the stuff of which obedient self-seeking is made.  An enterprising go-getter should be able to get her import license without paying a bribe to a surly bureaucrat.  Atomists call for institutional reforms and the like, to make systems run better and channel the self-interested behavior of those occupying them in a useful direction.  For them, it is all about efficiency and smoothly rewarding the right kind of ambition....  On the other hand, the moralistic critics see the problem not as a politicized market, but as marketized power.  They might agree on redesigning institutions to combat corruption.  But officials’ moral decay and disregard for the common good get most of their attention.  That a cadre would even think of reselling medicines so he can get the latest mobile phone troubles them far more than the lax accounting that makes it easy for him to get away with it.  The critique goes inward, to an infection of the soul.  It shows more sensitivity to the changes in outlook that atomist gains have produced....

 

 

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