On global economic justice (from pages 215–16):

 

.... Global atomism offers little promise of an assault on Southern poverty.  It has enslaved the spirit to the stomach while satisfying neither.  The success of atomist groups in winning power over the last few decades now works against them, in fact.  Many a 1960s radical now drives a Mercedes and intones all the reasons to be “realistic” about social justice.  Those who once preached equality, when battling older elites and taking over campuses for the counterculture, now have a stake in squashing serious challenges to capitalism....  A struggle against the cultural ailments of atomist modernity can tie into a struggle against global economic injustice....  In this light, mixing what most of humanity needs culturally with what most of humanity needs materially is the only sort of vision we should entertain, whether or not fate blesses it in the end.  People need their spirits ignited and their stomachs filled.  For many in the shantytowns and forgotten hamlets, relieving grinding poverty would be among the most vivid promises of a postliberal world commonwealth....  Neither liberalism nor the regional antiliberalisms are equipped to bring global economic justice, or even to speak of it coherently.  Liberals make lucre-lust more respectable than in any previous culture, while fundamentalists and nationalists lack language for talking about justice beyond their own patches of land....

 

 

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