On the selective nostalgia of many traditionalists (from page 157):

 

.... Perhaps the most striking feature of their nostalgia is how selective it is.  These thinkers and movements have an oddly flattened view of their traditions.  Television epics inspired by Hindutva, for instance, obscure the hierarchies of caste and class that shaped most of Indian history.  The myth instead becomes one of Hindu domestic harmony and hardened boundaries against Muslims and Europeans.  Maya historians have the same blind spots when they describe the civilization that preceded the Spanish conquest.  The whole culture comes across as some sort of glorified village.  They ignore the preconquest Maya religious and political elites, reducing them to functional “specialists.”  Chinese antiliberals likewise downplay the layering of virtues in Confucianism.  Their version of Confucian ethics deals mainly with horizontal, personal relationships: loyalty, kinship, and the like.  The grander demands that the mandarin literati once put on themselves count for little.  Whatever their setting, all these writers would very likely endorse Grillo’s claim that “we here in the Andes, from time immemorial and for all times, are communitarian.”  All these antiliberals have a selective memory, and pass off their own populist priorities as the essence of their heritage....

 

 

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